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Project Description
Position Description
  
What rank of students are encouraged to apply?
What majors of students are encouraged to apply?
What are the approximate number of hours per week that the student is expected to be participating in the research?
Which semester would the student begin their work?
  
  
  
  
What information should applicants provide?
Is there any additional information that you would like to provide?
  
  
  
CommunicationSilvia Knobloch-Westerwick, Communication
This project investigates how attention to an individual's physical surroundings changes as a result of being cognitively engaged with a narrative. Attention will be measured using a secondary reaction time task to visual stimuli while participants listen to 4 audio clips.
A research assistant is needed to help with data collection during SP20. The RA would be administering the reaction time task and the other components of the study (pre- and post-exposure questionnaires).
Dedication to research, ability to instruct participants and problem solve. Knowledge of reaction time software is a plus but not necessary.
Any rank.
Communication, Psychology,  or other social science. Other majors could be considered if the student is particularly interested.
up to 10, but flexible
spring 2020
one semesteracademic credit or volunteer12/20/2019Email Elizabeth Riggs at riggs.160@osu.edu
Provide a resume or CV, class schedule, and a short (1 paragraph) statement of interest.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
CommunicationDr. Melissa Foster, School of Communication
For this project, we will be watching movies and coding the amount and type of violence.
We will be watching movies that contain violence, including sexual violence.  While watching the movies, we will be taking notes on the violence with a codebook.  For example, we will take down information on the type of violence (e.g. sexual violence or non-sexual violence), characteristics of the victim (e.g. gender, approximate age, etc...), and details about the depiction of the violence (e.g. was nudity shown, was there revenge in the movie plot, etc...)
There are no required skills because I would teach you everything you need to know.  However, since the movies may be violent,  I do not recommend this project for anyone who would be uncomfortable watching and these movies. 
Any
Any
9
Spring 2020
We would take this one semester at a time, but students could elect to stay involved for 1 to 4 semesters.Academic credit only12/31/2019Interested students should email a resume to Dr. Melissa Foster at foster.1182@osu.edu
Applicants should provide information about why they might be interested in this project. 
For this type of research, I'm looking for students are are motivated to work independently.  While we would be meeting weekly to discuss progress, the majority of the work would be done on your own.  When you email me your resume, please do also feel free to ask any questions you may have. 
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Psychology, Mental Health, Higher Education, Race-Related Experiences, Multiculturalism, Diversity and InclusionDr. Steven Stone-Sabali; College of Education and Human Ecology; Department of Educational Studies
This project focuses on understanding the educational and mental health experiences of college students of color. Several psychological, social, and educational variables (e.g., the impostor phenomenon, shame, anxiety, depression, racial identity) will be investigated within racially diverse samples of college students. This work also examines how college students of color navigate the social landscape of higher education institutions, which includes understanding their experiences with cross-racial faculty, peers, counselors, and university members.
Duties include, but are not limited, to conducting library searches; developing literature reviews; managing research databases and other data systems; helping with document formatting and editing; interviewing research participants for qualitative studies; transcribing interviews that are audio taped from the qualitative studies; developing and administering surveys; compiling and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data; assisting with manuscript development, grant projects, and conference proposals/presentations; and helping with clerical duties related to current and developing research projects.
Work independently and as a member of a team, good organizational skills, and the ability to work on several projects simultaneously, and must be proficient in MS Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint). Stats proficiency preferred but not required.
Candidate must be an advanced undergraduate student (e.g., junior or senior) or graduate student with coursework in education, sociology, psychology, anthropology, or related social science fields. The candidate must be in good academic standing (3.5 GPA or above for undergraduates or 3.8 GPA or above for graduate students).
The nature of this work is interdisciplinary and is not limited to specific majors. Candidates should have had coursework in education, human development, sociology, psychology, anthropology, or related social science fields.
The work schedule is very flexible; however, candidate must work minimally 10-hours per week.
Spring 2020
Candidates should be able to commit to at least one semester. Beyond that, work on projects will be on-going if agreed upon by the researcher and candidate. Research/academic credit, work-study experience, or voluntary experience.1/17/2020Interested candidates should contacted Dr. Steven Stone-Sabali via email (stone-sabali.1@osu.edu):
Applications for this position must include information that highlights candidates’ professional background and qualifications. In order to be strongly considered for this position, the candidate must be in good academic standing (3.5 GPA or above for undergraduates and 3.8 GPA or above for graduate students). Candidates interested in work-study positions, must be eligible for federal work study funding. Contact your financial officer to determine if you are eligible for federal work study.

To apply for this position, candidate must submit the following information to Dr. Steven Stone-Sabali via e-mail (stone-sabali.1@osu.edu): (a) cover letter, (b) resume, and (c) names and contact information for references.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Leukocyte Biology, Immunology, Cardiovascular, Cardiometabolic Prabha Nagareddy, Cardiac Surgery
The research in my lab is broadly focused on identifying the mechanistic links between the so-called “cardiovascular risk factors” such as diabetes, obesity, smoking, gut dysbiosis etc.  and the disease. We mainly study the role of innate immune cells particularly the neutrophils in regulating inflammation, a common determinant of all cardiovascular risk factors. To test our hypotheses, we use various genetically modified mouse models, tissue and cell culture systems and employ techniques such as flow cytometry, multiphoton microscopy, qRT-PCR/ RNA sequencing, protein identification and quantification by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, ELISAs. We also perform various surgeries (e.g. myocardial infarction, parabiosis, organ transplants) and study the effect of above risk factors on cardiovascular disease outcomes. We also have set up collaborations with interventional cardiologists to study leucocyte biology in cardiac patients. Our ultimate goal is to develop various therapeutic strategies (e.g. monoclonal antibodies, pharmacological inhibitors) to reduce inflammation and improve outcomes in cardiovascular (e.g. atherosclerosis, heart failure) and metabolic diseases (e.g. diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance) by targeting specific signaling pathways in neutrophils.
The student will be trained by a senior postdoc or other members of the lab. Following training, the student is expected to work independently on their own small projects with minimal supervision or contribute to the overall goals of the project. Training will be provided by experts in handling mice, surgeries, preparing and staining samples for flow cytometry, IHC, Western blotting etc. Attention to detail, ability to carefully follow directions, and communication skills are necessary. We require a minimum of one or two 3-hour time blocks/ week during the initial training period but we always favor students who can commit for longer hours.
No experience is required but the student is expected to show excitement, curiosity and eagerness to learn and master the required research skill sets.
Any
Science background, Biomedical Sciences
One or two 3+ hour block /week. However, we encourage longer time commitments for better learning experience.
ASAP
No limitsAcademic credit or volunteer to begin with. Depending on the ability to contribute to the overall research program, the student may be appropriately compensated. 1/31/2020
Updated CV
We expect students to have a productive and successful training experience in our lab. We prefer student who are capable of balancing/managing their time between the lab and course work so that they could be successful in their careers.
NoFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Leukocyte Biology, Immunology, Cardiovascular, Cardiometabolic Prabha Nagareddy, Cardiac Surgery
The research in my lab is broadly focused on identifying the mechanistic links between the so-called “cardiovascular risk factors” such as diabetes, obesity, smoking, gut dysbiosis etc.  and the disease. We mainly study the role of innate immune cells particularly the neutrophils in regulating inflammation, a common determinant of all cardiovascular risk factors. To test our hypotheses, we use various genetically modified mouse models, tissue and cell culture systems and employ techniques such as flow cytometry, multiphoton microscopy, qRT-PCR/ RNA sequencing, protein identification and quantification by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, ELISAs. We also perform various surgeries (e.g. myocardial infarction, parabiosis, organ transplants) and study the effect of above risk factors on cardiovascular disease outcomes. We also have set up collaborations with interventional cardiologists to study leucocyte biology in cardiac patients. Our ultimate goal is to develop various therapeutic strategies (e.g. monoclonal antibodies, pharmacological inhibitors) to reduce inflammation and improve outcomes in cardiovascular (e.g. atherosclerosis, heart failure) and metabolic diseases (e.g. diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance) by targeting specific signaling pathways in neutrophils.
No experience is required but the student is expected to show excitement, curiosity and eagerness to learn and master the required research skill sets. The student will be trained by a senior postdoc or other members of the lab. Following training, the student is expected to work independently on their own small projects with minimal supervision or contribute to the overall goals of the project. Training will be provided by experts in handling mice, surgeries, preparing and staining samples for flow cytometry, IHC, Western blotting etc. Attention to detail, ability to carefully follow directions, and communication skills are necessary. We require a minimum of one or two 3-hour time blocks/ week during the initial training period but we always favor students who can commit for longer hours.
No experience is required but the student is expected to show excitement, curiosity and eagerness to learn and master the required research skill sets.
Any
Science background, Biomedical /biological sciences related
One or two 3+ hour block /week. However, we encourage longer time commitments for better learning experience.
Any
No LimitsAcademic credit or volunteer to begin with. Depending on the ability to contribute to the overall research program, the student may be appropriately compensated. 1/31/2020Prabha Nagareddy (Nagareddy.1@osu.edu)
UpdatedCV
We expect students to have a productive and successful training experience in our lab. We prefer student who are capable of balancing/managing their time between the lab and course work so that they could be successful in their careers.
NoFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Pulmonary MedicineKaren McCoy, MD
Nationwide Children's Hospital is developing a Cystic Fibrosis Biorepository (CFB) to obtain and store biological specimens from Cystic Fibrosis patients. The CFB Core oversees the collection, storage, and distribution of CF specimens collected during routine care visits at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Specimens are obtained during standard-of-care visits, procedures, surgeries, or other clinically necessary encounters.  Specimens housed in the CFB are made available to investigators interested in furthering current CF research efforts, or to new investigators entering into CF related research.
In addition to the CFB, other studies that the student may work on include topics such as mental health on parents with children who have CF, evaluating changes in mental health before and after starting an FDA approved CF drug, effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) on CF patients, asthma pathophysiology, immune responses to CF, and the impact of enzymes on intestinal Ph in kids with CF.

 Student responsibilities would include data entry, consenting, IRB management, data collection, case report creation, data pulls, and specimen transport. The student will need to complete all required Nationwide Children's and research training before working on any projects.
Research and consenting experience is desired, but not required.
Any undergraduate student in good academic standing that has an interest in research.
Psychology, nursing, pre-med, biology, public health, and/or social works students are desired.
20
Spring 2020
3-6 monthsacademic credit1/31/2020April Hunt
CV/Resume and at least three reference.
Students should be available to work primarily on Tuesday's and Thursday's.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Political communication, psychology, decision-makingDr. Jason Coronel, School of Communication
This laboratory experiment examines people’s beliefs and behavior following an information-based manipulation. The goal of this project is to run and complete an experiment in order to write a manuscript intended for publication in an academic journal. More information about similar projects can be found on our lab website (http://www.commcogsystems.com/).
We’re seeking motivated and enthusiastic individuals interested in 1) learning about the research process and 2) gaining experience coding. Individuals must have knowledge about coding in Java (preferred) or Javascript. We prefer individuals with excellent organizational skills with keen attention to details. Research assistants will learn/gain experience on all of the following: coding a program for data collection, running participants on behavioral studies, and analyzing data.
Knowledge of Java or Javascript,Minimum GPA of 3.3
Freshman, sophomore, junior
Computer Science, Communication, Psychology, Political Science, jEconomics, Biology, Data Analytics, Economics, Chemistry, Anthropology
10 to 15 hours a week
Spring semester
5 monthsAcademic credit, voluntary experience1/24/2020Please contact Ms. Shannon Poulsen (PhD student and project lead) at poulsen.6@osu.edu.
Please provide your name, contact information, and CV/resume. If any skills are not reflected on the CV/resume, supplementary information detailing additional skills can be provided in the same email.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
CommunicationDr. Shelly Hovick, School of Communication
This is a health communication project that is investigating the influence of a health narrative on related attitudes and behaviors. We are interested in how an episode of a popular television show that presents information about a health issue can influence attitudes towards that health topic.
We specifically need help in collecting experimental data for a dissertation project. Duties will include supervising participants who come into the lab to participate and potentially help in content analyzing data.
Native English Speaker, Availability on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, or Thursdays
Any rank
Communication
6
Spring 2020
One semesterCan be for academic credit or voluntary experience1/20/2020Kara Rader, rader.175@osu.edu
Resume, GPA, and schedule
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Communication & PsychologyBrad Bushman
We are doing a project looking at the association between narcissism and aggression. The goal of this project is to gather all relevant studies that exist on this topic and include them in this analysis to state what is known about the association.
You will be looking through articles that are relevant for our analysis and code them together with the researcher. You will be working closely with the author of the article to gather all information necessary to say something about the association between narcissism and aggression.
Attention to detail. Ability to read and understand academic articles.
Any
Any
3-9
SP20
OneAcademic credit or voluntary experience1/28/2020Sophie Kjaervik: Kjaervik.1@buckeyemail.osu.edu
Resume and transcript
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
AnthropologyDebbie Guatelli-Steinberg and W. Scott McGraw, Dept of Anthropology
Paleoanthropologists who seek to understand dietary adaptations in human ancestors study modern non-human primates to identify links between dental structure and function. Enamel, the hard, outer covering of a tooth, is one of the most scrutinized aspects of dental anatomy because it interacts with food directly. This research explores how the thickness and structure of tooth enamel, which appear to change over short evolutionary time periods, relate to specific aspects of diet and tooth function in primates. To achieve this goal, this research leverages a collection of primate skeletons housed at The Ohio State University, consisting of Old World monkey skeletons from the Taï Forest (Côte d'Ivoire) and other African field sites. Data on diet and tooth use associated with these skeletal remains provides opportunities to investigate how enamel variation in living primates relates to critical features of their diets and oral processing behavior.
Students may be tasked with any of the following:
• Complete lab safety training online
• Photograph skulls and teeth
• Take dental impressions of monkey teeth
• Create epoxy casts of monkey teeth impressions
• Prepare specimens for histological sectioning (may include x-ray and sterilization)
• Data / file management
• Assist in data collection
Organizational skills
All
All
5 hours per week
Spring 2020
1 semester, with the possibility of extension over the summer and/or fallAcademic credit, work-study experience (if eligible), or voluntary experience2/20/2020Interested students should contact the graduate research assistant, Mackie O’Hara via email (ohara.102@osu.edu)
Please attach a letter to your email with the following information:
• Name/pronouns
• Major/Minor
• Expected date of graduation
• Anthropology/biology coursework (not required)
• Previous research/lab volunteer experience
• Why are you interested in this project?
• What is your general availability this semester?
• Contact information for at least one reference
NA
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Economic History, History of Discrimination, Data CollectionTrevon D. Logan, Department of Economics
 A successful candidate will be joining an international research team of economists studying the dynamics of discrimination in public accommodations in the pre-Civil Rights era. We are looking for a dedicated and meticulous research assistant to undertake the digitization of U.S. Census of Business records.

Our main object of study is the Green Books. During the Jim Crow era finding overnight accommodations, purchasing gasoline, and having a meal on the road posed major challenges for African American motorists, particularly in the American South. The Green Books provided a listing of establishments across the U.S. that would serve African American customers. The aim of this project is to combine information from the Green Book directories and the U.S. Census of Business to create a measure of "access to services" in different towns/counties that allows for comparison across time and space of the discrimination facing African Americans. 
The central task of this position will be the careful digitization of establishment counts by county using published versions of the U.S. Census of Business. The goal is to create a database that has the listing of establishments, by type (eating places, accommodations, service stations) for all counties in the United States.  Later this information will be combined with Green Books location information to gain a better understanding of the economic and historical forces behind the decision of an establishment to serve African Americans or discriminate against them.

- Experience with Microsoft Excel (mandatory)  - Experience with data entry and working  with large datasets (preferred)   
Third and Fourth year students
Economics, History, Geography, Statistics
12-20
Spring Semester 2020
Three semesters Salary/Stipend, Academic Credit, or Work Study2/28/2020Trevon D. Logan (logan.155@osu.edu)
Resume and Unofficial transcript
NoFailed on Start (retrying)
  
HistoryTrevon D. Logan, Department of Economics
 A successful candidate will be joining an international research team of economists studying the dynamics of discrimination in public accommodations in the pre-Civil Rights era. We are looking for a dedicated and meticulous research assistant to undertake a library search and literature review of the history of Negro Motorist Green Books (commonly referred to as the Green Books).

During the Jim Crow era finding overnight accommodations, purchasing gasoline, and having a meal on the road posed major challenges for African American motorists, particularly in the American South. The Green Books provided a listing of establishments across the U.S. that would serve African American customers. The aim of this project is to combine information from the Green Book directories and the U.S. Census of Business to create a measure of "access to services" in different towns/counties that allows for comparison across time and space of the discrimination facing African Americans. 


The central tasks of this position are:
(1) A careful search for primary documents and also secondary sources, guided by recently published histories of the Green Books. Extensive use will be made of Lexis Nexis and other historical newspaper databases.
(2) The production of an annotated bibliography of sources that are deemed of interest to the research team.
Experience conducting independent research using digital and print sources, searching and accessing historical newspaper databases and archives
Third and Fourth Year Students
History or related discipline
12-20
Spring Semester 2020
ThreeSalary/Stipend, Academic Credit, or Work Study Experience2/28/2020Trevon D. Logan (logan.155@osu.edu)
Resume and Unofficial Transcript
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Software DevelopmentSilvia Knobloch-Westerwick
The SEMI-ME research lab at the School of Communication at The Ohio State University is a collaborative group of researchers examining how people select and consume media, and what effects this has. The group conducts cutting-edge research, using new and novel experimental designs to examine modern media issues. Research covers a range of topics from health, entertainment, and news.
Extend and maintain SERA application (Selective Exposure Research Application) that simulates mediated communication environments (e.g., news aggregators like GoogleNews, social media such as Facebook or Instagram) for the purpose of tracking what messages individuals select.
Java, HTML, CSS, MySQL, PHP, Ruby on Rails, Angular/Bootstrap
Sophomore & Junior
Computer Science Engineering
5-9
SP20
4unpaid internship2/9/2020Lena Ishtayeh (ishtayeh.4@osu.edu)
statement of interest, resume, programming experience, references if available
NoFailed on Start (retrying)
  
CommunicationSilvia Knobloch-Westerwick, School of Communication
As smartphones are now the most likely medium for news consumption for American adults, this study investigates the unique implications of consuming news on mobile devices. Specifically, we examine whether individuals selectively expose themselves to different information in the mobile domain. We predict that individuals who browse a news site on their personal mobile device (versus a "neutral" mobile phone provided by the experimenter and a desktop computer, respectively) will be more likely to select attitude-consistent information with high social cues. Our work represents an important first step to explore the novel affordances of the mobile domain and how they interact with news consumption.
The primary duties would be to assist in data collection. This would mostly involve running participants through a research protocol. Undergraduate researchers would also be encouraged to review the research design and propose potential hypotheses to be investigated, as well as helping us collate questions for future surveys.
All students are welcome to apply
All students are welcome to apply.
All students are welcome to apply.
4
WI20
2We are able to offer academic credit (COMM 4998, Undergraduate Research) if the student so wishes, however this is not required.2/14/2020Contact Morgan Quinn Ross, PhD Student, at ross.1655@osu.edu
Please provide a brief introduction including your name, major, GPA, and any previous relevant experience you might have (including research experience, classes taken, etc).
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Biology and Computer ScienceShaurya Prakash
Microbiological contamination is a common problem which affects manufactured goods including pharmaceuticals, foods, cosmetics and personal care products. Contamination of manufactured goods can render the product ineffective and may also pose serious health risks for consumers. The traditional method for bacterial detection consists of isolating a suspected sample, preparing an appropriate culture media and innoculating plates. The specimen then grows until a macroscopic observation can be made. Though effective, this method can take up to several days for a final result, potentially putting consumers at risk.
In this project, we are evaluating machine learning and computer vision approaches for detection, identification and enumeration of bacterial contamination in liquid samples. The overall goal of this project is to develop algorithms and scalable experimental protocols for rapid and real-time assessment of liquid samples for microbial contamination.
Students will assist with preprocessing and labeling any relevant biological data for training machine learning algorithms. This will primarily include videos, images and chemical data (eg. Raman Spectra). This position is for students interested in the biomedical field and the application of machine learning.
Prior programming experience desired, preferably in MATLAB or python. Prior research experience a plus.
Sophomore - Senior
Biomedical Science and Engineering majors
10
SP20
At least 1 semesterAcademic credit or voluntary experience2/9/2020Jonathan Kadowaki (kadowaki.4@osu.edu)
Current resume and unofficial transcripts
N/A
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Biochemistry, Molecular Genetics, BiophysicsRichard Fishel, PhD Cancer Biology and Genetics
The Fishel lab studies Mismatch Repair (MMR) and Homologous Recombination Repair (HRR) and the biophysical and genetic interactions between these two pathways. Our biophysical analysis includes the development of single molecule imaging technologies that allow the real-time visualization of the dynamic processes associated with protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, as well as live cell single molecule analysis of DNA repair processes. We are looking for talented undergraduates interested in medical research. This is a volunteer position, part time during the academic year, potentially full time over the summer.
Depending on the experience of the undergraduate, the lab duties may initially be limited to supportive tasks (such as preparing solutions) with the expectation of advancing to an individual medical research project. For more information about our research visit our website at
Intro Biology and Chemistry courses
Second semester freshmen, sophomores, honors students or regular students with at least a 3.5 GPA
Physics, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Biology, Biomedical Sciences and Pharmaceutical Sciences
10-15hrs/ week in blocks of no less than 2 hrs, 8am-5pm M-F. Fulltime in the summer
Spring 2020
At least one year, part time during school year and full time possible in the summervoluntary experience, academic credit2/21/2020Email molgenlab1@gmail.com 
Resume, unofficial transcript, class schedule including extracurriculars
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
VirologyKristine Yoder, PhD Cancer Biology and Genetics
Retroviruses have an RNA genome. After the virus enters a cell, the viral enzyme reverse transcriptase copies the RNA into a linear double-stranded cDNA. The viral cDNA is part of a complex of viral and host proteins termed the pre-integration complex (PIC). The PIC includes the viral enzyme integrase. The PIC moves to the nucleus where integrase catalyzes the covalent joining of the viral cDNA genome to the host DNA. Some retroviral integrases, including HIV-1 and Prototype foamy virus (PFV) integrases, form a tetramer with the viral DNA. Other retroviruses have an octamer of integrase, such as mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). We are interested in how these integrase complexes search the target chromatin for an integration site. How does the search happen when DNA is bound by nucleosomes in the context of chromatin? What features of nucleosomes and/or integrase are important for the search? These are key questions we are trying to answer.
We are looking for talented undergraduates interested in medical research. This is a volunteer position, part time during the academic year, potentially full time over the summer. Depending on the experience of the undergraduate, the lab duties may initially be limited to supportive tasks (such as preparing solutions) with the expectation of advancing to an individual medical research project. For more information about our research visit our website at https://u.osu.edu/yoder.176/research-2/research/

Preferred introductory chemistry and biology coursework.
Second semester freshmen and sophomores.
Virology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Biology, Biomedical Sciences and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Physics honors students or regular students with at least a 3.5 GPA interested in undergraduate research. 
10-15hrs/week during the school year, full time in summer
Spring 2020
At least one yearvolunteer experience, academic credit2/21/2020yoderlabosu@gmail.com
Resume, unofficial transcript and current class schedule, including extacurriculars
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Software DevelopmentSilvia Knobloch-Westerwick
The SEMI-ME research lab at the School of Communication at
The Ohio State University is a collaborative group of
researchers examining how people select and consume
media, and what effects this has. The group conducts cutting-edge
research, using novel experimental designs to
examine modern media issues. Research covers a range of
topics from politics, health, entertainment, and news.
Extend and maintain SERA application (Selective Exposure
Research Application) that simulates mediated
communication environments (e.g., news aggregators like
GoogleNews, social media such as Facebook or lnstagram)
for the purpose of tracking what messages individuals select.
Java, HTML, CSS, MySQL, PHP, Ruby on Rails, Angular/Bootstrap
Sophomore & Junior
Computer Science Engineering
5-9
SP20
2-4 semesters (or until graduation)Academic credit, volunteer experience, paid work available upon research project funding3/28/2020knobloch-westerw.1@osu.edu
statement of interest, resume, programming experience,
references if available
GPA of 3.5 or higher
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Microbial Infection and Immunity/MicrobiologyDr. Stephanie Seveau, Microbial Infection and Immunity
The Seveau Lab focuses on the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. The student will learn the infectious cycle of Listeria monocytogenes, as well as the immune response to the pathogen, under the guidance of graduate students.  For more information on on-going projects in the lab please see, https://microbiology.osu.edu/people/seveau.1
We are looking for two highly motivated students that are interested in infectious disease. The students may be trained to assist with the collection or analysis of experimental data. The students may be considered for lab management responsibilities depending on interest and abilities. The students will be expected to help with lab maintenance tasks, and should be organized and committed to research. As the each student gains experience in the lab, they may begin working on their own project under the supervision of a graduate student.
No experience necessary but prior research experience (even if limited) is preferred
We prefer first or second year students, but the application is open to all
Preferred but not required: biological sciences or related majors
10-15 in both semester and summer (if applicable)
Spring or Summer 2020
up to 4 semesters or until graduationvoluntary experience and academic credit possible3/4/2020puleo.14@buckeyemail.osu.edu  johnson.6926@buckeyemail.osu.edu  azari.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu  Please send interest email to all three of us. Thank you!
Resume/CV, GPA, and relevant coursework
N/A
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Emergency MedicineOlivia-Marie Groves, Nationwide Children's Hospital
The Emergency Medicine Research Team at Nationwide Children’s Hospital is looking for outgoing and energetic undergraduates to help screen and enroll patients as part of our research initiatives. We are committed to excellence in research. As a member of the nationwide research consortium PECARN (Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network), you will have the opportunity to be involved in cutting edge pediatric emergency care research. Volunteering with the Emergency Medicine Research Team will immerse you in the fast-paced environment of one of the nation’s busiest Emergency Departments while interacting with various patient care team members to conduct high quality clinical research.
The Undergraduate Research Assistant will:
▪ Assist the research staff in the ED by screening and enrolling patients in multiple research studies
▪ Perform administrative duties such as data entry, making copies, refilling enrollment packets, and restocking supplies
▪ Learn about multiple aspects of pediatric emergency care through observation and interaction with all members of the patient care team
Currently enrolled in an undergraduate program, possess an overall GPA of >3.19, commitment of 1 academic year
Current freshmen, sophomores and juniors
Pre-health
6 hours/week
Autumn 2020
Two semesters (August 2020-Spring 2021)This is a volunteer experience3/6/2020EMURA@nationwidechildrens.org
Name
Major
Rank
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Medicine (Otolaryngology)Aaron Moberly, MD - Department of Otolaryngology
Our studies aim to investigate the perceptual processes used by adults with cochlear implants to understand speech. Cochlear implants (CIs) provide a degraded representation of the spectro-temporal information within speech signals, and individuals with CIs must take this degraded information and form a meaningful speech percept from it. This study aims to examine whether the manner in which CI users organize these degraded auditory signals into meaningful perceptual constructs, as well as their access to fundamental properties of the speech signal, play a significant role in their ultimate speech perception. By doing so, methods may be developed to improve ultimate language outcomes for patients with CIs.

Our multidisciplinary study team's objective is to examine language and cognitive factors as predictors of success in speech recognition for adults with CIs and adults with normal hearing (NH), including both older and younger NH adults, as well as preoperative candidates for CI.
Functions as a Student Research Assistant providing support for administrative and research tasks associated with research being conducted in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery; completes programming tasks in Matlab; performs data entry and prepares data for analysis; assists with study coordination; performs data querying and general project support; performs other routine lab maintenance and other duties as assigned; provides assistance in support of clinical research studies; assists with data maintenance & reporting of clinical research.
Prior programming experienced in Matlab required. Prior research experience a plus.
Sophomore – Senior
Engineering, computer science, or related discipline
10
Spring 2020
At least 2 semesters$8.70-10.00 per hour3/31/2020Kara Vasil, AuD - kara.vasil@osumc.edu
Please apply at the OSUWMC careers posting here: https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/careers/current-openings/students/457670
Contact kara.vasil@osumc.edu with any questions.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  



What Is Artificial Intelligence (AI)? Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to the simulation of human intelligence in machines that are programmed to think like humans and mimic their actions. The term may also be applied to any machine that exhibits traits associated with a human mind such as learning and problem-solving. The ideal characteristic of artificial intelligence is its ability to rationalize and take actions that have the best chance of achieving a specific goal. Understanding Artificial Intelligence When most people hear the term artificial intelligence, the first thing they usually think of is robots.

That's because big-budget films and novels weave stories about human-like machines that wreak havoc on Earth. But nothing could be further from the truth. Artificial intelligence is based on the principle that human intelligence can be defined in a way that a machine can easily mimic it and execute tasks, from the most simple to those that are even more complex. The goals of artificial intelligence include learning, reasoning, and perception. As technology advances, previous benchmarks that defined artificial intelligence become outdated. For example, machines that calculate basic functions or recognize text through optimal character recognition are no longer considered to embody artificial intelligence, since this function is now taken for granted as an inherent computer function.

AI is continuously evolving to benefit many different industries. Machines are wired using a cross-disciplinary approach based in mathematics, computer science, linguistics, psychology, and more. Applications of Artificial Intelligence The applications for artificial intelligence are endless. The technology can be applied to many different sectors and industries. AI is being tested and used in the healthcare industry for dosing drugs and different treatment in patients, and for surgical procedures in the operating room. Other examples of machines with artificial intelligence include computers that play chess and self-driving cars. Each of these machines must weigh the consequences of any action they take, as each action will impact the end result. In chess, the end result is winning the game.
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Cultural AnthropologyDr. Mark Moritz and Dr. Barbara Piperata, Department of Anthropology
The goal of this project is to assess the state of methods training in cultural anthropology. We use two datasets in this project: (1) data from a survey of 142 anthropology instructors about their opinions about methods training; and (2) data from 140 anthropology methods syllabi. The goal is to describe the variation in instructor’s opinions and the way they teach methods.
You will be managing the data set and using simple statistics to describe and analyze the data. You will work independently but you will meet at least once a week with one of the faculty leads. You will keep track of your work in a log and write up the results from the statistical analysis in a weekly report.
The following skills / experience are required: (1) experience using Microsoft Excel; and (2) experience with statistical analysis.
All students can apply.
Anthropology majors.
5 to 10 hours per week
Spring 2020 Semester
Two monthsWe pay $12.50 per hour2/26/2020Email Dr. Mark Moritz at moritz.42@osu.edu
Please send an email with your resume and a brief description of your Microsoft Excel and statistical skills and experience.
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Social PsychologyDr. Jennifer Crocker, Department of Psychology
Our lab studies people's social motivations. In one line of research, we look at how people's goals affect their romantic relationships and how people thrive in the face of challenge and find a purpose. In another line of research, we examine how people respond to workplace diversity and how we can decrease prejudice in society.
Typical responsibilities include recruiting and running participants in studies, data entry and coding, literature reviews, creating stimuli for studies, and many more opportunities. If you haven't had experience with any of these skills - don't worry! No previous knowledge is required to join.
No previous research experience is required.
All years
All majors
At least 6 hours per week
Fall 2020
At least two semestersAcademic credit or volunteer3/27/2020https://faculty.psy.ohio-state.edu/crocker/lab/opportunities.php
Please see this link to complete the application: https://faculty.psy.ohio-state.edu/crocker/lab/opportunities.php
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Cardiac Physiology Peter Mohler, College of Medicine
The Mohler Lab focused on uncovering the mechanisms underlying abnormal heart rhythms and heart failure in children and young adults with the goals of designing new therapies for diseases at the level of the individual as well as population. Volunteering in the Mohler Lab will immerse you in the basics of wet lab research while studying under one of the leading researchers in the cardiac physiology field.
Undergraduate Research Assistants will:
Assist research staff with data collection and analysis
Make solutions for experiments
Assist with laboratory maintenance
Learn how to keep a scientific notebook
Learn how to read and interpret scientific data
No experience necessary
First and second year students are preferred, but the application is open to all.
Biological sciences or related majors
10-15 hours per week during the semester; up to 20 hours during the summer
Spring or Summer 2020
Up until graduationVoluntary experience with the potential for academic credit. 3/20/2020Interested students should contact Jordan Williams at jordan.williams@osumc.edu
Resume/CV, GPA, relevant coursework
N/A
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Cardiovascular researchDr. Sakima Smith, Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute
Our lab is interested in studying cardiac structural proteins, specifically spectrins. Spectrins help maintain cell integrity and are involved in signal transduction pathways as well. Our lab is investigating the effect of loss of spectrins on cardiac functions. Additionally, we are investigating the side effects of different anticancerous drugs on the heart.
We are looking for talented undergraduates interested in medical research. This is a volunteer position, part time during the academic year, potentially full time over the summer. Volunteering in the Smith Lab will immerse you in the basics of wet lab research. Depending on the experience of the undergraduate, the lab duties may initially be limited to supportive tasks (such as weaning mice, genotyping and making solutions) then you will gradually learn more complex procedures/techniques such as western blotting, cell staining, co-immunoprecipitation, cell culture, blood pressure monitoring and ECGs.
No experience necessary but prior research experience (even if limited) is preferred. Summer availability is a must (no less than 20-30 hours)
Second semester freshmen and sophomores, honors students or regular students with at least a 3.5 GPA
Biological sciences or related majors (e.g. pre-med, neuroscience, etc.)
10-15hrs/week during the school year,  in the summer no less than 20-30 hours
Second semester freshmen and sophomores.
up until graduationVoluntary experience with the potential of academic credit3/20/2020mohamed.derbala@osumc.edu
Resume/CV, GPA, and relevant coursework (if found)
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Neurology, Opthalmology, and OptometryAndrew Sas M.D. Ph.D. Department of Neurology
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the most common long-term sequela of repetitive head injury. It is believed that the length of exposure to repeated concussive and sub-concussive head injuries is most correlated with development of CTE. Athletes who have played American football, hockey, wrestling, boxing, and soccer are at risk after retirement from their sports. Currently, there are no diagnostic tools to assess neurodegeneration related to repetitive head injury clinically. The gold standard for CTE diagnosis is pathological analysis of tau deposition by immunohistochemistry at autopsy after patient death along with a history of cognitive decline. Therefore, there is a need to find a way to screen for CTE in athletes who have participated in sports that result in repetitive concussive and sub-concussive head injuries earlier so that cognitive interventions can be considered. We hypothesize that high resolution retinal and optic nerve imaging including Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics (AO-OCT) can be used clinically to screen for retinal and optic nerve head neurodegeneration related to repetitive head injury in former athletes. Of particular interest are the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the eye that project from the retina through the optic nerve to the lateral geniculate nucleus and superior colliculus. OCT is a non-invasive, non-contact, in-vivo retinal imaging technique that is widely used for the clinical diagnosis of eye related diseases and conditions in humans. In animal models, OCT has been used as a surrogate marker of overall brain atrophy related to neurodegeneration. However, in both of these areas, the OCT instrumentation is limited to measuring the thickness of the RGC and nerve fiber layers and cannot resolve individual RGCs. In this project, we are utilizing unique imaging capabilities at OSU, namely an AO-OCT system in addition to a standard clinical optometry OCT system. We hypothesize that AO-OCT can detect and quantify individual RGC loss and directly measure the abnormal thinning of individual nerve fiber bundles that project from the RGCs to brain via the optic nerve due to repetitive head injury that is not present in adults who have not had repetitive head injury. The information gained from this research will increase our understanding of the pathophysiology of repetitive head injury. The goal is to combine this non-invasive imaging technology with clinical cognitive evaluations of former athletes that have sustained multiple concussions and subconcussive injuries. We hope to identify an imaging characteristic that corresponds with an identified cognitive change in these patients.
The role of the research assistant will be to contact and consent patients for the study. They will participate in the screening evaluation in the clinic and assist the team with research documentation as needed. The assistant will be expected to enter data into a database and assist both the clinical team and OCT imaging team with documentation and analysis tasks for the project. The volunteer must be available on friday mornings between 9 and noon for the clinical part of their time. The rest of their schedule is flexible. The research assistant is expected to talk with patients including describing the research project, helping them complete consent documentation, and entering clinical and OCT data into the project database.
Personal communication skills, and the ability to use a computer and enter data
Any year student can apply
Pre-med, optometry, and biomedical research students
3-6 hours
Spring, summer and fall available
3-9 months depending on schedule and research study timelinevolunteer experience3/20/2020email Dr. Sas
Applicants should provide: 1) course schedule, 2) CV or resume 3) A couple sentences in their email about their skills that will contribute to the project and why they are interested in the position.
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Driving Simulation Lab Research Janet Wiesenberger, PhD., Office of Research
Dr. Jan Weisenberger and Dr. Thomas Kerwin are seeking undergraduate research assistants, 15-20 hours per week, for projects underway in the Ohio State University Driving Simulation Laboratory (drivesim.osu.edu).
Studies in this lab cover all aspects of driver behavior, with an emphasis on developing and testing the usability of new in-vehicle systems (navigation, entertainment, etc.) to minimize driver distraction and create safer automobiles. The duties include assisting with daily operations of the laboratory, working with study participants, maintaining equipment and software, development of simulation scenarios, and capture and consolidation of research data.  The lab works with both university faculty and industry partners to conduct research.  Opportunities for student-initiated research projects are also available.
A minimum 3.0 GPA is required.  Strong candidates will have experience in one or more of the following areas:  computer programming, automotive engineering, 3D computer modeling, psychology, human factors, or behavioral science.
Freshman to Senior.Please note that we are hiring for student employees that are not graduating this semester.
Strong candidates will have experience in one or more of the following areas:  computer programming, automotive engineering, 3D computer modeling, psychology, human factors, or behavioral science.
15-20
Summer 2020
Summer 2020 with opportunity for continuation through Autumn/Winter SemestersHourly wage3/18/2020Cameron Wrabel, wrabel.3@osu.edu
Provide your weekly work availability schedule and a resume to attention: Cameron Wrabel, email: wrabel.3@osu.edu. Please note that we are hiring for student employees that are not graduating this semester.
This is job opportunity is considered an undergraduate student employee  classified position.
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Psychology and CommunicationDr. Brad Bushman
This project explores the relationship between narcissism and aggression. The goal of this project is to gather all relevant studies that exist on this    topic and include them in a meta-analysis I order to understand this.          association.
Research Assistants will find articles that are relevant to our analysis and code them together with the researcher. You will be working closely with the author of the article to gather all information necessary to identify any association between narcissism and aggression.
detail-oriented; organized; excellent reading and comprehension skills
All
All
3-9
SP20
2academic credit; voluntary experience3/20/2020Sophie Kjaervik (kjaervik.1@buckeyemail.osu.edu)
Resume
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Virology, biochemistry, molecular biologyKristine Yoder, PhD
After a retrovirus enters a cell, reverse transcriptase copies the RNA into a linear double-stranded cDNA. The viral cDNA is part of a complex of viral and host proteins termed the pre-integration complex (PIC). The PIC includes the viral enzyme integrase and moves to the nucleus where integrase catalyzes the covalent joining of the viral cDNA genome to the host DNA.  We are interested in how integrase complexes search the target chromatin for an integration site? How do host proteins influence integration? How does the search happen when DNA is bound by nucleosomes in the context of chromatin? What features of nucleosomes and/or integrase are important for the search?

Undergraduate research volunteers in the Yoder lab become familiar with common laboratory tasks such as making solutions, pouring SDS-PAGE and agarose gels, DNA minipreps, restriction digests, PCR reactions, and expressing recombinant proteins in bacteria. They advance to a project such as site directed mutagenesis of a protein of interest, and expression and purification of that protein. The long term goal is completion of an honors research project.
We are looking for talented undergraduates interested in medical research. This is a volunteer position, part time during the academic year, potentially full time over the summer. Depending on the experience of the undergraduate, the lab duties may initially be limited to supportive tasks (such as preparing solutions) with the expectation of advancing to an individual medical research project. For more information about our research visit our website at https://u.osu.edu/yoder.176/research-2/research/

Preferred introductory chemistry and biology coursework. No lab experience required, willing to learn, attention to detail, good communication
First or second years, with at least 3.5 gpa, honor students preferred
Biology, Biochemistry, Biomedical Science, Microbiology, Pharmacy, Molecular Genetics
10-15hrs/week M-F 9am to 5pm
Spring semester
At least 3 semesters part-time, with the possibility of full-time summervoluntary experience or academic credit3/31/2020yoderlabosu@gmail.com
Resume, unofficial transcript and class schedule including extracurriculars
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