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Project Description
Position Description
  
What rank of students are encouraged to apply?
What majors of students are encouraged to apply?
What are the approximate number of hours per week that the student is expected to be participating in the research?
Which semester would the student begin their work?
  
  
  
  
What information should applicants provide?
Is there any additional information that you would like to provide?
  
  
  
psychology, neuroscience, speech and hearing scienceIrina Castellanos, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Otolaryngology Head-and-Neck Surgery
The ABLE Project wishes to identify how multiple pathways involving language and EF skills may contribute to social, emotional and behavioral outcomes during preschool development in prelingually deaf, early-implanted children with cochlear implants (CIs) compared to normal hearing controls. We hypothesize that CI users will display deficits in externalizing, internalizing, and adaptive functioning during preschool development, and that delays observed in language and EF will explain some of the individual variability in these outcomes. Further, we also predict that pathways regulating social ,emotional, and behavioral outcomes will differ as a function if hearing status.
Tasks include the following: completing assigned trainings and observations (e.g., CITI training, training  on administration/coding of assessments), data collection with participants and/or otherwise interacting with families; data coding, entry, and analysis; scanning and/or transfer of participant files to the server; lab meetings, data blitzes and practice talks by team members; scientific reading and writing related to ongoing lab projects; prepping of posters, manuscripts, and/or other dissemination activities, community engagement, or outreach events. 
Being comfortable interacting with families and children
We encourage students entering their second (sophomore) or third (junior) year of undergraduate studies to apply. It is important to note that if students are intending on completing major projects (i.e., an undergraduate research thesis) that enough time is provided. Also important to note, we like for each of our students to complete at least one individual project, if interested. This can be a poster, talk, or any research-driven project that the student wishes to undertake.
psychology, neuroscience, speech and hearing science, and biology on a pre-med track
8-12 hours per week for at least 2 semesters; all lab members are expected to maintain a consistent weekly schedule
second half of Summer Semester 2019
at least 2 semestersIt is possible to complete research for credit, starting Fall 2019. It is expected that students register for a minimum of 2 credits, with each credit equaling 4 hours.6/18/2019Students should apply on the project website:  https://u.osu.edu/cognitivelab/for-students/ 
Students will be prompted for required information like name, phone number, email address, major, GPA, a copy of their unofficial transcript, and a couple questions about their research interests.
Each student should feel encouraged to include any information that he/she feels is important and unique. The Graduate Research Assistant for ABLE, Natalie Safdar, will reach out to schedule interviews. Interviews will take place between 6/19-6/25, with orientation on 6/28.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Nutrition ResearchDr. Richard Bruno, Department of Human Sciences, Human Nutrition Program
The purpose of this study is to investigate if daily consumption of milk fat globule membrane-enriched milk can improve gut health and inflammation. For this study, we are looking to recruit men and women between the ages of 18-65 who have metabolic syndrome.  We will study the health benefits of the anti-inflammatory component of milk fat, known as milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), which is made up of healthy fats and proteins. We will be studying if MFGM-enriched dairy milk decreases inflammation and improves glucose tolerance to lower heart health risks. The study consists of two two-week periods separated by at least two weeks. We will provide all of the meals for the participants. The participants will come in to the lab ~2 times per week to pick up the food and milk beverages. On day 0, day 7 and day 14 we collect blood, breath sample, urine, and stool samples from the participants.
Interested volunteers will be involved and be trained in various parts of this study. They will be involved in the recruitment of the study participants that includes advertisement such as posting flyers, conduct phone interview and schedule people for the screening visit. Sample processing and clinical assays: volunteers will be trained in sample processing such as serum/plasma separation from blood sample and their analysis. Meal preparation: Volunteers will be involved in participant’s meal preparation that includes buying groceries, cooking and packing meals and related kitchen works. Data analysis: volunteers will be trained in diet analysis by using NDSR software. There will be opportunity in poster presentation in scientific forum.
Wiling to complete online training as required by IRB
All undergraduate students
Science major will be more appropriate
Depends on student's interest and availability (10-15 h)
Any semester
 at least 2 semesterswork study experience, credit or voluntary experience7/24/2019Avi Pokala (Pokala.2@osu.edu; 740.417.0157); Dr. Richard Bruno (bruno.27@osu.edu, Phone: 614.292.5522) 
Proof of enrollment, Buck ID
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Cardiovascular ScienceBrenda Lilly, School of Medicine, Pediatrics
Will work with research associates and mentor to perform lab tasks related to research goals. This will include helping with organizational tasks, lab maintenance, and collecting data. Opportunity to perform experiments will be based on the student’s motivation and ability, but is not guaranteed.
Will work with research associates and mentor to perform lab tasks related to research goals. This will include helping with organizational tasks, lab maintenance, and collecting data. Opportunity to perform experiments will be based on the student’s motivation and ability, but is not guaranteed.
Some lab experience is required, and a basic chemistry lab is essential.
Freshman/Sophomore or Junior
Molecular Biology, Genetics, Biochemistry, Chemistry
10-20
Fall
One or morecredit9/1/2019Brenda Lilly brenda.lilly@nationwidechildrens.org
Cv and career goals
Candidates will be required to complete a quiz to be considered for the position
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Neurology/ImmunologyBenjamin Segal, Chair of Neurology Department, Director of the Neurological Research Institute
We study how immune cells cause the central nervous system autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis. To do this, we work in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis called Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). Currently, most of our projects focus on evaluating the role of myeloid cells in causing pathology in EAE. We use mice and tissue/cells isolated from mice and perform a variety of analysis, including genotyping, qPCR, flow cytometry, histology/microscopy, immunoblots, and lumiex.
Interested applicants will assist graduate students and post-doctoral research fellows in completing experiments contributing to our overall goal of studying myeloid cells in the pathogenesis of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Work will include preparing solutions, preparation of lab supplies, cell staining for flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, running samples for flow cytometry, preforming PCR and qPCR analysis, handling mice, and assisting with tissue collection. In addition to lab work, the student will have the opportunity to participate in lab meetings, where we critically evaluate data collected in the lab and other scientific literature.
Able to use Microsoft office, willing to complete all training necessary for position
Sophomores and Juniors
Science major
Minimum of 6 hours per week, minimum 2 hour shifts
Fall
at least 1 yearVolunteer or academic credit12/31/2019Graduate student Ashley Munie, munie.2@osu.edu
resume/CV including relevant coursework and class schedule
NoFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Hearing LossWilliam Riggs, Department of Otolaryngology
This study evaluates the auditory system in children with cochlear implants using electrophysiologic techniques. We will study characteristics of how the inner ear and auditory nerves vary across different types of hearing loss.
As part of the study team your responsibilities will include coding of electrophysiologic data, scheduling and helping in behavioral testing of pediatric subjects. Additionally, other duties may include organizational tasks, lab maintenance, and manuscript preparation.
Able to use Microsoft excel, willing to complete all training necessary for position
Freshman, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors
Speech and hearing science, neuroscience, engineering, computer science
10-20
Fall
 1 year (11-12 months)Hourly wage avaiable 8/19/2019William Riggs at william.riggs@osumc.edu
Resume
This position is located on the 4th floor at the Eye and Ear Institute (parking free) at 915 Olentangy River Road.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
EducationDr. Sarah Lang, Human Sciences
Student researchers will be helping us with a new research project looking at a training program for early childhood educators. We will be following two groups of teachers over the course of a year, one who is receiving a new training and a control group.
You may help us with the recruitment of research participants, distribution of surveys, classroom observations, entering and compiling data, and other research tasks.
 
You must have access to your own transportation to sites across Franklin County.  You must be availability in the morning, at least two days a week.
Any rank of student is welcome to apply.
Psychology, Education, Social Work, or related field
Minimum 10 hrs per week
Fall 2019
Minimum 2 semester commitmentAcademic credit. Stipend may be available, depending on experience8/12/2019Dr. Rosalie Odean (odean.1@osu.edu)
Resume or CV, Cover letter explaining your experience and interest in this position
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
MetabolomicsGeorge Kyriazis
Our studies aim to understand how taste receptors (TRs) found in peripheral organs such as the gut, pancreas, muscle, adipose, immune, and brain sense nutrients during and after a meal to regulate hormones and nutrient metabolism.  We are currently working in four systems: intestine, muscle, immune.
Understanding the chemosensory role of TRs in response to ingested nutrients may shed light on the association between their consumption and adverse public health outcomes, such as diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome.
The student will work with research associates and mentor to perform lab tasks related to research goals.  Work may include preparing solutions, preparation of lab supplies, immunohistochemistry, preforming PCR and qPCR analysis, genotyping, data collection, handling mice, and assisting with tissue collection. In addition to lab work, the student will have the opportunity to participate in lab meetings, where we critically evaluate data collected in the lab and other scientific literature.
Fine-handling skills are a must.  Extreme detail and organization needed.  Strong work ethic is essential.
Sophomores
Life Sciences
10-15 during school year.  Full time during summer (paid)
ASAP
Until graduationvoluntary or for credit during school year, paid during summer9/21/2019Vanida.serna@osumc.edu
Resume, statement of goals and interests
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Cardiac PhysiologyProf. Vadim Fedorov, PhD. Department of Physiology and Cell Biology
An Undergraduate research position will be available for a highly motivated young scientist to directly study heart rate disorders in humans by using functional, molecular, and structural 3D mapping techniques in the lab of Dr. Fedorov. This is a unique opportunity to work on cutting-edge scientific projects with the OSU Cardiac Team (cardiac surgeons and electrophysiologists, cell biologists, biomedical engineers, etc.) The translational research in Dr. Fedorov’s lab presents the opportunity to enter an operating room in a hospital, receive a human heart, and then conduct research on the human tissue with state-of-the-art equipment.  Opportunities to present research at the Denman Undergraduate Research Forum and other poster presentations at annual scientific meetings (such as Heart Rhythm Society and American Heart Association) are possible for qualified and devoted students.
The student research will be expected to analyze the electrogram recordings taken from patients with atrial fibrillation to directly impact their care. The student will work closely with a graduate student and present their data at the weekly lab meeting. The student will be expected to be organized and committed for this research.
Preferred but not required: Second or Third year students, students who have completed physiology or anatomy courses, students with prior research experience (even if limited), engineering skills and experience with MATLAB, and a minimum GPA of 3.4.
Rising Sophomore and above.
Pre-medicine and/or students wishing to pursue a PhD in fields related to human physiology.  Majors including: Biomedical Science, Biomedical Engineering, Biochemistry, Biology, Neuroscience, etc.
15-25 hours/week
Autumn 2019
At least 2 Semesters, Summer availability preferredSalary possible, academic credit possible, work-study possible, volunteering possible9/30/2019Brian Hansen (hansen.296@osu.edu)
Interested Students should send a statement of purpose, a current resume, and their unofficial transcript.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Microbial PathogenesisSamantha King, Pediatrics
We have several projects in our group that are focused around streptococcal adhesion. These bacteria can be associated with both health and disease. We are studying how they interact with the host. Specific details of the project will depend on the student’s interests.
Although research experience is a plus, we have taught other students from scratch with success. The most important factor is fit with our group and a desire  to contribute to research in a meaningful way. We are looking for is a motivated, hard-working person looking for a fun and rewarding research experience. We believe in teaching all aspects of science including science writing, practical skills, data analysis, ability to think critically about your work, ability to critically evaluate literature and presentation skills. These skills will be useful in any future career. The student will be responsible for all aspects of the project under my direct supervision. All of our undergraduate students present posters at local forums, many have received grants and several are authors on published papers.
A GPA of 3.2 or higher, highly organized, able to keep good records
Sophomore, Junior
Biological science, biochemistry and related majors
a minimum of 10 hours per week
Fall unless otherwise arranged
until graduationAcademic credit or STEP program. We cannot accept volunteers.8/31/2019Sam King  - samantha.king@nationwidechildrens.org
GPA, CV and a cover letter indicating why they are interested in this position.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Educational psychologyYeoeun Kim
This study focuses on the various goals that students pursue including academic, social, and well-being goals. This study examines the dynamic interplay between goals and the role of self-regulatory processes in balancing different goals (i.e., academic, social, and well-being goals). This work provides insights in improving balance between different domains of students’ lives and supporting students at risk of overload. This study is important because it may provide suggestions to educators on how to facilitate students’ well-rounded development as lifelong learners.
This position provides research opportunities for motivated undergraduate students who are interested in educational psychological research! You will be working with a graduate student mentor (Yeoeun Kim). You will have a chance to develop and practice skills necessary to conduct research, deepen your understanding of the educational field, and build relationships with a graduate student mentor. Participating as a research assistant will provide an insider view of the various aspects of a research project.
This project involves organizing and managing collected information, qualitative data coding and entry, literature reviews, and other research-related duties. Detailed training will be provided in advance.
Strengths in organization, attention to detail, and strong work ethic
Second year, third year, fourth year
Students from the College of Education and Human Ecology (EHE);
Students majoring in Psychology from the College of Arts and Sciences
about 3-4 hours per week
Autumn 2019 (mainly September & October)
2-3 monthsSalary ($9.5/hour)9/2/2019Please contact the graduate student mentor (Yeoeun Kim) via e-mail (kim.6105@osu.edu)
Students should provide the following information below:
(1) Full name, (2) Contact information (e-mail address and phone number) (3) A copy of unofficial transcript (4) In about 1 page, write a statement of interest to include a brief introduction of yourself, why you are interested in the project, previous research experience (if any), and career goals
*From the applicants, a small number of students will be invited to meet Ms. Kim for an interview before final selection.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Nutrition; Psychiatry Irene Hatsu, PhD. Human Sciences; Coellge of EHE
The current focus of our lab is integrative nutrition treat options for mental health. We are running a clinical trial for 6-12 year olds with ADHD symptoms where we are providing a nutritional supplement as an alternative treatment option.
Most of the undergraduate experience in our lab comes down to interacting with the children and their families, biological sample collection, helping with clinical assessments and data coding/communication that goes into scheduling parents for a 4 month long intervention. The commitment to this study would include several visits a week to the hospital clinical research center in the mornings or afternoon, depending on your class schedule.
Do you have any prior experience working with children? And for the fall semester, how many mornings do you have open (no class)?
Sophomore or higher
Nutrition or a related health sciences field
10 hours
Fall
One or moreAcademic Credit8/30/2019Leanna Perez, PhD. Postdoctoral Researcher
Year of schooling; their major and GPA; Resume/CV; If they have worked with children before.
This study involves many morning visits with children and their families to complete a fasting blood draw. Please explain your morning availability Monday-Friday in the fall semester.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Bone Tissue Engineering and Medical Device Regenerative MedicineDavid Dean, Ph.D., Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, and Materials Science and Engineering
Undergraduate Research Assistants will be expected to be ready to train in Lab Safety (ehs.osu.edu), project-specific tasks in clucing device design (implant CAD), 3D printing (polymers and metals), stem cell culture, animal surgery, and device metrology (SEM, histology, mechanical testing, material properties, resorption/corrosion). You will determine your project of interest, document the protocol, complete an experimental design, and begin needed training to conduct a full time project over summer 2020. The goal of your project will be to have results that are reportable at local  research days and/or in journal publications.
Dr. David Dean is seeking undergraduate researchers to work throughout the academic year, including full time in summer 2019, to assist with tissue engineering and medical device research. Please visit our website, www.osteoengineering.com, to learn more about our research. All of our publications are available from that website. Work is on one of two teams: "Cell Culture and Surgery" or "Medical Device Design, Fabrication, and Validation".

The primary projects in the laboratory involve:(1) stem cell-seeded, 3D printed polymer-based bone tissue engineering scaffolds, (2) stiffness matched NiTi (nickel titanium) mandibular (lower jaw) fixation devices, (3) resorbalbe Mg alloy skeletal fixation devices.
Cell Culture and Surgery team: laboratory safety training, cell culture, and/or animal model research. Medical Device Design, Fabrication, and Validation team: material testing, CAD for 3D printing, biomechanics, computer programming, and/or statistics
iven the requirement of full time work in Summer 2019, only Freshman through Juniors may apply unless the candidate will enroll for a 5th year of undergraduate studies.
Biochemistry, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Science, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Industrial Systems and Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Welding Engineering
5-15 during academic year, full time in summer 2020.
Training can begin as soon as possible (i.e., Fall 2019). Must have approved project and be fully trained by April 1, 2020.
11-44 months (2 to 8 semesters)All of the above are possible, but it is unlikely that a student will receive salary or stipend in the first year.11/22/2019David Dean, PhD (David.Dean@osumc.edu)
(1) Maximum one page Letter of Interest explaining: (a)  Why you are interested; (b)   how you qualify for the position (e.g., relevant past experiences); (c) current career goals if any; (d)  Weekly Schedule of available times to attend lab meetings or work on research activities for Fall 2018.

(2) Maximum two page Resume with the following: Resume with the following: (a) Name and contact information (home address, email address, and phone number); (b) University Rank (e.g. sophomore) and anticipated graduation month and year (e.g., May 2022); (c) Declared or anticipated Major(s) and Minor(s); (d) Relevant experiences (e.g., courses, previous research activities, previous work experience).
Please look at Osteo Engineering Website (www.osteoengineering.com) for further information.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Cell and Molecular Biology; Cancer BiologyAnne Strohecker Ph.D. Dept of Cancer Biology and Genetics
The Strohecker lab (Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics) is currently seeking highly motivated students interested in autophagy and cancer. Current projects will provide experience in mammalian tissue culture, western blotting and microscopy and provide exposure to cloning, immunohistochemistry and mouse genetics.  Short and long term positions are available immediately. Please contact Dr. Strohecker to discuss further. Academic credit or volunteer positions available.
Candidates should be detail oriented, able to keep laboratory notebook (mandatory), works well with others Highly motivated, willing to learn new techniques.  Previous lab experience would be helpful but not required.
Commitment of minimum of 10h per week.
rising sophmores and up. 
Commitment of 10h/ week
available immediately. Students interested in joining the group for the coming summer are encouraged to contact Dr. Strohecker in February to ensure ability to apply for summer research grants.
credit or volunteer positions available9/19/2019Dr. Strohecker/ anne.strohecker@osumc.edu
Statement of interest, long term goals, copy of recent advising report
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Macrophage biology and InfectionMurugesan Rajaram
Recent NIH funded research project needs talented under graduate students. Our study aims to understand the function and phenotype of myeloid cells in the heart during infection. Mainly our focus is to  study the cardiac macrophages, exosomes and microRNAs in the regulation of cardiac inflammation during bacterial and viral infection in mouse model.
Will work with Post doctoral researchers, research associates and mentor to perform lab tasks related to research goals. This will include helping with organizational tasks, lab maintenance,  mouse colony maintenance and collecting data.  Opportunity to develop own projects and experiments will be based on the student’s motivation and ability.
Seme lab experimence or interest to learn  , i.e molecular biology  and immunological techniques.
Freshman or Sophomores; expected  to stay until  the graduation.
BMS, Biology, Microbiology Neuroscience, Health Scciences
10-20
Fall
atleast 6 semestersyes, depends on the work ethic and interest8/30/2019Murugesan.Rajaram@osumc.edu
Resume, statement of goals and interests
Recent NIH funded research project needs talented under graduate students. Based on the interest and work ethic we will think about paying some hours.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
EducationDr. Sarah Lang, Human Sciences
We are conducting a study looking at the effectiveness of an online training program for teachers in early childhood classrooms. Our program has been used for several years in the context of military childcare centers, but this is the first time we will implement this program in local Columbus schools. We will be looking at teachers knowledge of classroom practices, as well as their experiences as a teacher, and conducting classroom observations.
Student researchers will be helping us with a new research project looking at a training program for early childhood educators. You may help us with the recruitment of research participants, distribution of surveys, classroom observations, entering and compiling data, and other research tasks.
Must have access to your own transportation to sites around Franklin County.
All levels
Psychology, Education, Social Work, and related fields
Minimum 10
Fall 2019
At least 2 semestersAcademic credit, possibility for a stipend8/30/2019Dr. Rosalie Odean odean.1@osu.edu
Resume or CV, Cover letter explaining your experience and interest in this position
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
bioinformatics, cancerDan Spakowicz
Recent results demonstrate a strong role for microbes in cancer, including its development and response to treatments. The OSUCCC-James sequences tumors of many patients as part of a national consortium, in which microbial transcripts may be observed. This project will involve the processing and analysis of exogenous sequences within tumor RNAseq data from patients and relate the results to other aspects of the tumor RNAseq and clinical features.
Setting up a sample processing pipeline, producing abundance tables of identified exogenous sequences, machine learning or other computational modeling to relate these tables to clinical features.
all
all
10
fall
1-2 semesters with many potential follow up studiescredit or voluntary8/30/2019Dan Spakowicz
research experience, CV
likely work with a small team
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Organismal BiologyDr. Andreas Chavez, EEOB
The Chavez Lab in the Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology and the Museum of Biological Diversity at OSU is looking for volunteer Lab Assistants to help with museum specimen preparation! We are studying the process of diversification in mammals and are interested in how and why mammalian species adapt and become new species. We are working on a variety of wild mammal studies, including genomics of adaptation and speciation in tree squirrels, venom evolution in shrews, comparative evolution of color pattern in squirrels, conservation genetics in gophers, and so on…For more information about the lab, visit our website: http://www.aschavez.com. The animals that are being prepped have been collected for research (DNA and morphological studies) and will eventually join the natural history collection at the Museum of Biological Diversity at OSU (https://tetrapods.osu.edu/). Specimen preparation will take place in the Chavez Lab in Aronoff.
No experience is required, but this type of work involves dissecting animals, extracting tissues to be placed in cryogenic tubes, skinning animals, and then stuffing and sewing animals as museum study skins. Attention to detail, ability to carefully follow directions, and fine motor skills are necessary. For those interested we require a minimum of at least one 3-hour time block/week to dedicate to prepping an entire specimen in one day. We are also favoring students that can commit for 6 months or more. The selection of students for this position is highly dependent on whether their schedule overlaps wit our lab assistant who will be training new preparators.

If you are interested please fill out the following 2 links (information about yourself & availability during the week for Autumn 2019):
https://forms.gle/WU7gfwq4odU28MKU9
http://whenisgood.net/9xaqrzb
Interest of ability to dissect animals
None
Biology, zoology, EEOB, and wildlife majors are encouraged to apply
3
Autumn 2019
ongoingvoluntary8/1/2020Stephanie Secic (secic.2@buckeyemail.osu.edu)
Fill out both links provided in the position description
Fill out both links provided in the position description
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
cell biologyHay-Oak Park, Dept of Molecular Genetics
The project aims to understand how cell polarity is involved in asymmetric segregation of  cellular damage and controling cellular lifespan.
Main tasks are digital image processing and analyses of long-term microscopic imaging.
Basic knowledge of computer programs such Excel and Powerpoint
any rank
any natural science and engineering
5~10 hours per week
Au
1 semestereither paid or academic credit (depending on students' need or qualification)9/30/2019Dr. Park (park.294@osu.edu)
Resume or advising report; with a list any knowledge/experience of software such as MatLab etc.
This project requires heavy use of computers for data analyses and organization skills. Quick understanding of new software is critical for this project.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
T cell immunology, Cancer Immunotherapy, EpigeneticsDr. Hazem Ghoneim, Microbial Infection and Immunity
Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are our most important defense against tumors or virus-infected cells. Recent advances in understanding T cell biology led to breakthrough discoveries for treating cancer or chronic virus infections. Despite the unprecedented success of T cell immunotherapy in treating multiple previously refractory cancers, many patients remain nonresponsive, while other patients relapse after initial clinical response. These challenges raise questions on the molecular mechanisms that regulate T cell function and response to immunotherapies.
Our lab aims to understand how T cell immune responses are generated and maintained during infections and cancer. We are particularly interested in:
1- Elucidating the mechanisms of epigenetic programming in CD8 T cells during infections and cancer.
2- Understanding how de novo epigenetic programs are regulated during the development of T cell exhaustion
3- Discovery of novel therapeutic targets to epigenetically reprogram T cells for treating chronic virus infections and cancer.
The student will work with Postdoctoral visiting scholar, research assistant and mentor to perform lab tasks related to research goals.  Work may include preparing lab supplies, preforming PCR and cloning analysis, genotyping, handling mice, assisting with tissue collection, cell culture, and Flow cytometry. In addition to lab work, the student will have the opportunity to participate in lab meetings, where we critically evaluate data collected in the lab and other scientific literature. Opportunity to develop own projects and experiments will be based on the student’s motivation and ability.
Mol biology and Immunology courses are desired. Candidate should be able to keep laboratory notebook (mandatory), works well with others, and highly motivated.  Previous lab experience and work with mice would be helpful but not required
Freshman or Sophomores; expected  to stay until  the graduation. Higher rank students may also apply if they have relevant research experience.
BMS, Biology, Microbiology, Neuroscience, Health Sciences
10-20
Fall
4-6 semestersAcademic credit, possibility for a stipend depending on the student's research ethics and interest.9/20/2019Hazem.Ghoneim@osumc.edu
Resume, statement of goals and interests
Our lab website for further information:
https://u.osu.edu/ghoneim.2/
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Hematology and Experimental therapeuticsLalit Sehgal, Ph.D., Division of Hematology.
Dr. Sehgal is seeking undergraduate researchers to work throughout the academic year, including full time in summer 2019, to assist with generation of ex-vivo model system to study Bone marrow microenvironment during progression of Hematological malignancies.
The primary projects in the laboratory involve: (1) Isolation of Bone marrow stem cell and accessory stromal components. (2) Maintain them in culture (3) develop ex-vivo co-culture model with tumor cells.
Stem cell isolation, cell culture, 3-d culture, organoid formation,  RNA isolation and Real time PCR, Genetic manipulation using Crisper-Cas9 system. Training will be provided
Given the requirement of full-time work in Summer 2019, the only sophomore through Juniors may apply unless the candidate will enroll for a 5th year of undergraduate studies.
Biochemistry, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Science, Genetics, Molecular biology.

5-15 during academic year, full time in summer 2019.
Fall Training can begin as soon as possible (i.e., Fall 2018). Must have approved project and be fully trained by April 1, 2019.
11-20 months.All of the above are possible, but it is unlikely that a student will receive salary or stipend in the first year.10/4/2019Lalit Sehgal at lalit.sehgal@osumc.edu
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
NeuroscienceSung Ok Yoon, Biological Chemistry & Pharmacology
We have published that deleting a stress kinase from Alzheimer's mouse reduced amyloid by 90%.  We are now developing small molecule inhibitor that targets the kinase as a potential therapeutic agent.
Brain uptake of glucose is known to decrease long before Alzheimer's patients exhibit cognitive decline.  From longitudinal analyses of Alzheimer's mouse plasma, we found that the glycolytic pathway is perturbed.  We are investigating how dysfunctional glycolysis influences amyloid clearing in Alzheimer's mice.
Interests in Alzheimer's disease, be able to work in the summer
Freshmen or Sophomores Honor students who wish to go to professional schools after graduation
Neuroscience, Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, Biomedical Science, Biological Engineering
During semesters, 4-10 hrs/week
any semester, but want students who can work in the summer
4-6 semesters including summerVoluntary, but can be paid11/29/2019emails to sung.yoon@osumc.edu
Current CV with GPA
Students will have hands-on training.  Within the last 4 years, 4 students went to medical schools including OSU med.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Gene TherapyLluis Samaranch, Ph.D., Neurosurgery department.
L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency, is a rare genetic disorder in which recessive inactivating mutations in the gene encoding the AADC enzyme lead to the deficient synthesis of dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine. Because of the specific step at which AADC functions in the monoamine neurotransmitter biosynthetic pathway (the conversion of L-DOPA to dopamine), patients do not respond to therapy with levodopa. There is no cure for AADC deficiency and most patients derive little symptomatic benefit from currently available medical therapies. Our group recently initiated a clinical trial in which AAV2-hAADC was delivered to the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) of children with AADC deficiency, and this trial has demonstrated promising results. However, the noradrenergic and serotonergic nuclei remain impaired. Since these patients have already been treated with this vector, we are concerned as to the safety of this potential follow-up therapy. We need to undertake a safety study of vector re-administration before we can offer participants the option a second infusion to relieve their profound norepinephrine and serotonin symptoms. This project aims to lay the groundwork for future pre-clinical and clinical studies by examining the immunological consequences of viral vector re-administration by developing preliminary parameters for vector re-administration in the rat model. This study will achieve this goal by using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, neutralizing antibody assays, and ELISPOT assays.
The work will require rodent brain sectioning in a sliding microtome. In addition, the candidate will assist in multiple tasks related to the project like tissue banking, sample managing and tissue staining. Samples will be assessed under microscope and patters of vector distribution, level of trasgene expresion and immune response will be eveluated.
No experience is required, but knowledge of neuroanatomy and histological analysis is preferred.
Sophomores Honor students
Neuroscience, Neurobiology, Biochemistry, Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Science, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering
5-10 during academic year, full time in summer
Training can begin as soon as possible
2 to 6 semestersVoluntary, but can be paid11/22/2019Lluis Samaranch (Lluis.Samaranch@osumc.edu)
1) Letter of interest
2) Schedule of availability and GPA
3) Current CV including Major/Minor and relevant experience
Candidate must be a highly motivated individual with a passion for science, attention to detail, and excellent interpersonal communication and written skills.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
NeurosurgeryShahid Nimjee
We use small and large animal models to treat blood clots (stroke and heart attack). The current thrombolyic is rTPA, but results in hemorrhagic conversion due to lack of reversibility. The PI has developed an aptamer based therapeutic which results in no immunogenicity, no toxicity, and specifically targets the protein responsible for platelet activation, aggregation, and adhesion to blood vessel walls (von Willebrand Factor). We have also created a company to facilitate the development of this therapeutic for Phase I Clinical Trials. Most importantly, we have developed a reversal agent for this innovative thrombolytic which stops activity of the aptamer in 2-3 minutes which is not currently available clinically to eliminate hemorrhage risk.
Student have the capability of learning small animal surgery, histology, platelet aggregometry, behavioral testing, in addition to leading their own part of the overall research program.
attention to detail, located and available at Columbus campus year round
freshman, sophomore, or juniors
science background- this experience is especially important for pre-med or graduate school applications
the more time the student spends in lab, the greater the possibilities for learning new techniques and being exposed to difference type of research (we do basic, translational & clinical research)
ASAP
indefinitely, we constantly have undergrads rotating through the labacademic credit or volunteer to start, your own project can be submitted for OSU funding opportunities12/31/2019Debra Wheeler (debra.wheeler@osumc.edu)
updated CV
Students must have the time to pursue research activities and be able to maintain adequate grades simultaneously. If the student has already committed the majority of their time to other pursuits, please do not contact us
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Sociology, Social PsychologyDavid Melamed, PhD, Department of Sociology
For this project, which is funded by the National Science Foundation, we are seeking students to act in experimental sessions. In each session, you will interact with one “real” participant over Skype (to avoid visual cues), and will be required to be assertive or passive, depending on the phase of the session. To do so, you will be provided a script, but will likely need to ad lib as real participants may do or say as they like.
Each session entails working with participants on a series of ambiguous tasks, and we are interested in how demeanor shapes social influence and perceptions of group members based on interaction patterns.
Students must be able to follow interaction guidelines to portray assertive or passive discourse over Skype
Any undergraduate student with a GPA of at least 3.5 may apply.
Sociology, Psychology, or Theatre preferred; others will be considered as well
Hours will vary depending on the availability of RAs, participants, and lab space. Students must have some availability within Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 1-5:30pm.
Spring 2020
One semesterActors will be paid for their time. Research credit is also possible.1/8/2020Graduate RA Leanne Barry (barry.263@osu.edu)
Email should include a resume, description of interest in study and relevant experience, and availability in the Spring
This project is funded by the National Science Foundation.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Gene TherapyLluis Samaranch, Department of Neurological Surgery
L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency, is a rare genetic disorder in which recessive inactivating mutations in the gene encoding the AADC enzyme lead to deficient synthesis of dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine. Because of the specific step at which AADC functions in the monoamine neurotransmitter biosynthetic pathway (the conversion of L-DOPA to dopamine), patients do not respond to therapy with levodopa. There is no cure for AADC deficiency and most patients derive little symptomatic benefit from currently available medical therapies. Our group recently initiated a clinical trial in which AAV2-hAADC was delivered to the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) of children with AADC deficiency, and this trial has demonstrated promising results. However, the noradrenergic and serotonergic nuclei remain impaired. Since these patients have already been treated with this vector, we are concerned as to the safety of this potential follow-up therapy. We need to undertake a safety study of vector re-administration before we can offer participants the option a second infusion to relieve their profound norepinephrine and serotonin symptoms. This project aims to lay the groundwork for future pre-clinical and clinical studies by examining the immunological consequences of viral vector re-administration by developing preliminary parameters for vector re-administration in the rat model. This study will achieve this goal by using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, neutralizing antibody assays, and ELISPOT assays.
Dr. Lluis Samaranch is seeking a highly motivated volunteer with passion for science and attention to details to work thought the academic year (including full time in summer).
The candidate will assist with rodent brain sectioning and immunostaining, as well as different molecular techniques. Blocks of 2-hours will be required based on the nature of the experiments, and 1-year commitment will be necessary.
No specific experience is required, but knowledge in Neurobiology/Neuroscience and Neuroanatomy will be preferred.
Freshmen or Sophomores Honor students
Neuroscience, Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, Biomedical Science, Biological Engineering

During semesters, 5-10 hrs/week. Full time in summer
As soon as possible.
2 to 6 semestersStipend can be possible.11/22/2019Lluis Samaranch (Lluis.Samaranch@osumc.edu)
1) Letter of interest
2) Current resume/CV
3) GPA and availability (class schedule)
Please check PubMed for further information about the Lab.
NoFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Environmental engineering & membrane filtrationDr. Linda K. Weavers, department of civil environmental and geodetic engineering
This project is focused on determining the ability of ultrasonic vibrations to mitigate biofilm fouling. Ceramic PZT (lead zirconate titanate) membranes have unique piezoelectric properties that allow for ultrasonic vibrations to be induced during membrane filtration. Dr. Weavers’ research group has shown effective in-situ de-fouling of latex particles using PZT membranes. Additionally, ultrasound has been proven capable of removing biofouling from a membrane’s surface. This work aims to characterize the ability of PZT’s in-situ ultrasonic vibrations to remove biofilm fouling from the membrane’s surface.
The student will spend most of their time working in the environmental research laboratories. Following a graduate student’s lead, the undergraduate student will perform (1) filtration/biofouling experiments - preparation, setup, monitoring, data collection, takedown and cleaning, (2) Staining and embedding of fouling membranes for confocal microscopy analysis and (3) investigation of the PZT membrane’s ultrasonic characteristics. With initial graduate student guidance, the student will feel comfortable working independently in a laboratory environment.
Research or analytical laboratory experience preferred, but not required.
Sophomore – Junior (2-3)
Environmental or Civil Engineering
The student should expect to commit 6-10 hours per week.
ASAP
Ongoing, 4+ semesters including summers.Paid12/13/2019Email Anderson.2233@osu.edu
Include a resume with expected graduation date and a letter of interest (1pg) explaining you interest, qualifications, experience and current career goals.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Communication, Political Science, Gender Studies, PsychologyJason Coronel, Communication
We invite applicants to join our lab in assisting with a study that examines how people evaluate and discuss political candidates. Using eye tracking measures, this study bridges what we know about candidate evaluation from political science and what we know about how people rely on stereotypes, to investigate how people talk about political candidates. 
The lab welcomes motivated and enthusiastic individuals interested in learning about the research process. We prefer individuals with excellent organizational skills with keen attention to details.   Research assistants will learn/gain experience on all of the following: generating experimental stimuli, conducting lab and field experiments, running participants on both eye tracking and behavioral studies, and analyzing data. More information about the lab can be obtained from our website (http://www.commcogsystems.com/)
Freshman, Sophomore, Junior
Communication, Women and Gender Studies, Psychology, Political Science, Computer Science, Economics, Biology, Data Analytics, Economics, Chemistry, Anthropology
10-20
Fall, Spring
2+Voluntary experience, academic credit11/7/2019Erin Drouin, drouin.6@buckeyemail.osu.edu
Please send an email (with a resume attached) to drouin.6@buckeyemail.osu.edu in order to setup an interview.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Mechanical Engineering, Material ScienceProf. Renee Zhao, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Description: This project utilizes novel functional soft materials to develop material and structural systems that can be used as soft robot for biomedical applications. For example, soft magnetic materials that can deform under an external magnetic field, which allows untethered control of robot systems’ locomotion for minimally invasive surgeries.
Involved skills: material synthesis, finite element analysis, robot design, control system design
- Fabricating functional soft composite
- Establish controlling systems for the soft robot
- Assemble biomedical device
SolidWorks
All rank
Mechanical Engineering, Material Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering
10
SP2020, Fall2020
2 semesterscredits can be gained through 4998,4999(H); salary upon negotiation 12/13/2019Prof. Renee Zhao (zhao.2885@osu.edu)
Resume
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Gene TherapyPiotr Hadaczek, Department of Neurological Surgery
CRISPR-based gene editing of the brain has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of neurological diseases. A large number of incurable brain diseases, such as Huntington's, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, are caused by the over-expression of pathogenic proteins and could be treated with CRISPR based therapeutics. However, despite its potential, developing CRISPR based therapeutics for the brain has been challenging because of delivery problems. In particular, two key challenges need to be solved before gene editing in the brains of large animals and in humans is possible. First, strategies for efficiently and safely delivering Cas9 and gRNA into neurons, after an intracranial injection, need to be developed. Second, strategies that can enable a large volume of brain tissue (> 1 cm) to be transfected after an intracranial injection of CRISPR reagents also need to be developed. The central objective of this proposal is to develop a delivery strategy for gene editing the brains of large animals after an intracranial injection, termed convection-enhanced CRISPR (C-CRISPR). C-CRISPR is based on using convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to deliver an engineered Cas9 RNP, which has been fused to multiple nuclear localization signals (NLS), and has been encapsulated in PEGylated block copolymers. C-CRISPR addresses the key translational bottlenecks that have prevented CRISPR from having a translational impact in the brain. In particular, because it delivers the Cas9 RNP directly, it avoids the toxicity problems of viruses and the manufacturing challenges of using mRNA, and consequently has great translational potential. In addition, C-CRISPR uses CED to distribute the Cas9 RNP across centimeters of brain tissue, and therefore has the potential to edit the brains of large animals. C-CRISPR is based on our preliminary data demonstrating that the Cas9 RNP fused to multiple NLS signals can edit genes in murine brains after an intracranial injection, and that Cas9 RNP complexed to PEG-block copolymers can be delivered to centimeters of brain tissue, in the striatum, after delivery via CED.
Dr. Piotr Hadaczek is seeking for a highly motivated volunteer with passion for science and attention to details to work thought the academic year (including full time in summer).
No specific experience is required, but knowledge in Neurobiology/Neuroscience and Neuroanatomy will be preferred.
Freshmen or Sophomores Honor students
Neuroscience, Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry, Biomedical Science, Biological Engineering
During semesters, 5-10 hrs/week. Full time in summer
As soon as possible.
2 to 6 semestersStipend can be possible.11/22/2019Piotr Hadackez (Piotr.Hadaczek@osumc.edu)
1) Letter of interest
2) Current resume/CV
3) GPA and availability (class schedule)
Please check PubMed for further information about the Lab.
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
  
Cancer biologyJenny Wang, Department of Cancer Biology
Research in Dr. Wang’s laboratory includes basic and translational research projects, aiming to 1) understand the molecular mechanisms of colorectal cancer metastasis, recurrence, tumor dormancy and drug resistance, 2) identify and validate novel therapeutic targets using cell culture, organoids, mouse models and patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) and 3) develop small molecule inhibitors and test their efficacy in vitro and in vivo. The main goal is to develop novel and effective therapies that can be taken to the clinical trials.
Recently, checkpoint blockade immunotherapy has shown promising results in a variety of cancers including colorectal cancer. As existing immune checkpoint therapies are not universally effective and may be limited by toxicities, discovery of other immunotherapeutic targets and combination strategies is a priority. Dr. Wang’s laboratory has recently developed several projects aiming to identify new therapeutic avenues and facilitate development of novel strategies to prevent cancer immune evasion and increase therapeutic efficacy of immunotherapy.
Students will be expected to engage in research-related work while in the lab. Tasks include completing assigned trainings and observations, routine tasks that help to maintain lab equipment, supplies and inventory as well as assist with experiment preparation; project-related experiments and data analysis; lab meetings; scientific reading and writing related to ongoing lab projects; preparation of posters and manuscripts.

The position is for students interested in pursuing a career in life sciences. If participating in a project that results in a publication, acknowledgment or authorship in papers are likely. 
Preferred introductory chemistry and biology coursework.
First/Second year honors student preferred. Will consider Junior.
Biomedical science related majors
10-15 hours during school, full-time in summer
Spring, summer or autumn semester
At least 12 monthsVoluntary experience or Academic credit 1/31/2020Jenny Wang, jing.wang@osumc.edu
CV, transcript and schedule
YesFailed on Start (retrying)
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